Friday, July 19, 2019

Music

A Rosenkavalier of masterly élan from Kirill Petrenko and the Bayerische Staatsoper at Carnegie...

Written a mere few years after the bleeding-edge operas Salome and Elektra, Richard Strauss’ Der Rosenkavalier hearkens back to 18th-century Vienna, regressing in musical language to a retrenchment in an unabashedly tonal idiom and portraying an altogether different world....

Bertrand Chamayou Review – a Formidable Lisztian

Nearly all of Liszt’s piano music is regulation 19th-century repertory nowadays, but complete performances of the most demanding of all his keyboard works, the Transcendental Studies, are still quite rare events – feats of endurance as...

The Week in Classical: BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra; Scottish Chamber Orchestra – Review

If the Scottish play has had its auld problems elsewhere (RSC and National Theatre), Scottish Opera, a company on the up, had bad luck last week when its opening night of a new Ariadne auf Naxos was cancelled...

BBC NOW/Van Steen Review – Dynamic Showcase of Young Welsh Composers

In his relationship with the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, conductor Jac van Steen’s championing of a younger generation of Welsh composers is remarkable. His vigour and commitment constitutes its own advocacy. The new clarinet concerto...

Classic Brit Awards to Make Comeback After Five-year Absence

After a five-year absence the Classic Brit awards, originally founded in 2000 in an attempt to create the same buzz for classical music as the Brits have for the pop industry, will return to...

Debussy festival marking the centenary of his death Birmingham

For Birmingham, collaboration has shaped a two-weekend Debussy festival marking the centenary of his death. The idea came from Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla, music director of the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, with concerts and talks across the...

Mahler/Riehn: Das Lied von der Erde Review – Brightness and Immediacy

Where once it was a curiosity more than anything else, Rainer Riehn’s chamber-ensemble arrangement of Mahler’s great song-symphony, first performed in 1983, seems to appear on disc almost as regularly as the original version nowadays. In...

Home Listening: a Feast of English Tudor and Jacobean Music

• Pleasure might be a first priority when listening to music, but it’s also a direct route into history. This is especially true of English Tudor and Jacobean music, which gives a sharp parallel insight...

Michel Lambert: Leçons de Ténèbres Review – Louis XIV’s Music Master on Disc at...

French-baroque enthusiasts will perhaps recognise Michel Lambert’s name for the hundreds of songs he composed for the court of Louis XIV, and maybe also as the father-in-law of Jean-Baptiste Lully. Born in 1610, Lambert was...

Arditti Quartet Review – Jewelled Mystery at the Fragile Borders of Audibility

It’s the web of sounds that the Italian composer Salvatore Sciarrino conjures from string instruments – teetering between the edges of noise and limits of audibility – that best define his instantly identifiable soundworld. The Arditti Quartet’s...

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