The incredibly talented 34-year-old American Audrey Kawasaki is a modern artist whose style can not be ignored.

 

Born March 31, 1982 in Los Angeles in the family of ethnic Japanese. Audrey studied at a Japanese school, read a manga from childhood, watched a Japanese TV show and listened to Japanese pop music. He is fluent in Japanese. Two years she studied painting at the Pratt Institute in New York. Now he lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

Audrey Kawasaki was greatly influenced by the manga, from here she works with girls with big eyes, as well as comics and modern. All the works of Audrey Kawasaki are imbued with the spirit of modernity. The images are innocent, but at the same time very tempting. Accuracy of the drawing and soft coloristic solutions also characterize the work of Audrey Kawasaki.

Lovely gentle beauties from an American artist with a Japanese origin, Audrey Kawasaki, is the embodiment of modern oriental beauty and grace. Mysterious and charming, these charmers, somehow reminiscent of Lolita, already captivated many hearts.

Perhaps the most amazing thing in the work of this remarkable artist is the absolutely remarkable combination of all these qualities, the panels of Audrey seem more magical than unreal and fictitious. In every picture, the eye literally “gets stuck”, I want to see the faces of strangers better, to find out what they are storing for the secrets.

The talented artist performs her works on wooden sheets, they, in combination with the technique of writing tempera, attract the views of even the most ignorant people in modern art. The girls in the paintings are shown very disturbing, mysterious, erotic, but at the same time innocent. From the work of Audrey comes colossal heat and intense energy. Her works contain air of melancholy.

The style of Audrey Kawasaki can be described as a combination of Japanese manga and Art Nouveau. Even the fact that in her paintings there are things that are absolutely not associated with each other, for example the skeleton of a bird instead of a hair clip in the girl’s hair, does not repel, but, on the contrary, attracts the eye. Her work can really be called magical, because, seeing at least one picture, a person, like a spellbound, can long consider it until he learns every detail.

Looking at her work, and I want to take a pencil and a brush and immediately draw something like that, or at worst make a copy.

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