Editors’ Picks: 12 Events for Your Art Calendar This Week, From the Watermill Gala to a Puppet Show Operated by a Crane

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Tuesday, July 26

Works from "Listening to Clay: Conversations with Contemporary Japanese Ceramic Artists" at Joan B. Mirviss Ltd., New York. Photo courtesy of Joan B. Mirviss Ltd., New York.

Works from “Listening to Clay: Conversations with Contemporary Japanese Ceramic Artists” at Joan B. Mirviss Ltd., New York. Photo courtesy of Joan B. Mirviss Ltd., New York.

1. “Listening to Clay: Conversations with Contemporary Japanese Ceramic Artists” at Joan B. Mirviss Ltd., New York

This talk from Asia Week New York celebrating the release of Alice and Halsey North and Louise Allison Cort’s new book, , is timed to Joan B. Mirviss’s gallery show of the same name, “Listening to Clay” (through August 26). Mirviss and the authors will be in discussion with Monika Bincsik, curator of Japanese decorative arts at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, which was the recipient of a major gift of Japanese ceramics by the Norths.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Guillermo Galindo. Photo by Zen Cohen, courtesy of High Line Art, New York.

Guillermo Galindo. Photo by Zen Cohen, courtesy of High Line Art, New York.

2. “Guillermo Galindo: Remote Control” at the High Line, New York

Experimental music composer, sonic architect, and performance and visual artist Guillermo Galindo brings his interactive composition  to the High Line. String quartet Ethel will perform, but the audience also contributes by playing pre-recorded sounds from war video games, military cockpits, and the aftermath of attacks that have taken place around the world. The piece is a reflection on how remote technologies such as drones have dehumanized warfare.

Location: The High Line, at the Spur on West 30th Street, New York
Price: Free, RSVP encouraged
Time: 8:30 p.m. and 9 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, July 28

Sofia Tomilenko/Софія Томіленко <i>Say Art Law!</i> @tsofiako. Image courtesy the artist and the Center for Art Law.

Sofia Tomilenko/Софія Томіленко Say Art Law! @tsofiako. Image courtesy the artist and the Center for Art Law.

3. “Art Law Day” at New York Law School

This annual conference hosted by the Center for Art Law will explore contemporary topics on all things art and law. Panels include “Immigration Law and Asylum for Artists,” “Thinking Creatively about Estate and Legacy Planning for Artists,” and “Artist-Dealer Relationships in the 21st Century.” The keynote presentation, by KleptoCapture task force director Andrew Adams, will focus on the anti-money laundering (AML) efforts in the art market. You can attend in person or virtually.

Location: New York Law School, 185 West Broadway, New York
Price: $40–250
Time: 1 p.m.–6 p.m., with reception to follow

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Lorraine O'Grady, <em>Announcement Card 1 (Banana-Palm with Lance)</em>, 2020. Photo courtesy Alexander Gray Associates, New York, ©Lorraine O'Grady/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, 2022.

Lorraine O’Grady, , 2020. Photo courtesy Alexander Gray Associates, New York, ©Lorraine O’Grady/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, 2022.

4. “An Evening With Lorraine O’Grady” at the Brooklyn Museum

Lorraine O’Grady’s entry to the art world was in 1980 with her persona Mlle Bourgeoise Noire, invading Just Above Midtown gallery in a dress made of 180 pairs of white gloves. Now age 87, she’s introducing first new persona since that memorable debut in the film , based on the artist’s performance at her 2021 Brooklyn Museum retrospective. A conversation with O’Grady, artist Sydney E. Vernon, and a trio of curators will follow the screening.

Location: Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, New York
Price: $25
Time: 7 p.m.–8:30 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Saturday, July 30

Stephen J. Shanabrook performing <em>BEATEN TO A PULP ON A BED OF MOSS</em> from his "COTTON CANDY" series at the 2019 Watermill Center Summer Benefit. Photo by Maria Baranova, courtesy of the Watermill Center, Watermill, New York.

Stephen J. Shanabrook performing from his “COTTON CANDY” series at the 2019 Watermill Center Summer Benefit. Photo by Maria Baranova, courtesy of the Watermill Center, Watermill, New York.

5. “Stand: The Watermill Center Summer Benefit” at the Watermill Center, Watermill, New York

Always the highlight of the Hamptons summer gala season, the Watermill benefit is known for its elaborate art installations and performances set amid the center’s bucolic grounds. Noah Khoshbin has organized this year’s 30th anniversary , which will feature an international set of artists including Turkey’s Gökçen Dilek Acay, Japan’s Tsubasa Kato, Croatia’s Vilim Poljanec, and many more, as well as the first chance to see new exhibitions from Christopher Knowles and Robert Nava. The evening will also offer light refreshments from Colin Ambrose of Estia’s Little Kitchen, a Mexican American restaurant in Sag Harbor.

Location: The Watermill Center, 39 Watermill Town Road, Watermill, New York
Price: $750 and up
Time: 6 p.m.–9 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Friday, July 29

Kathleen Ryan, Bad Lemon (Eclipse), 2020. Photo courtesy of the artist and Karma, New York.

Kathleen Ryan, , 2020. Photo courtesy of the artist and Karma, New York.

6. “Fruiting Bodies” at Tanya Bonakdar, New York

This tasty summer group show featuring Emeka Ogboh, Futurefarmers, Mat Collishaw, Dana Sherwood, Liu Shiyuan, Kathleen Ryan, Michel Blazy, and Slavs and Tatars is inspired by the old aphorism “you are what you eat,” offering a selection of works in which food is either the subject or the medium.

Location: Tanya Bonakdar, 521 West 21th Street, New York
Price: Free
Time: Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Friday, July 29 and Saturday, July 30

Poncili Creación, <em>No Gods Only Flowers</em>. Photo courtesy of MoMA PS1, Queens.

Poncili Creación, . Photo courtesy of MoMA PS1, Queens.

7. “Poncili Creación: No Gods Only Flowers” at MoMA PS1, Queens

Puerto Rican artist duo Poncili Creación will use 80-foot-high boom cranes typically used in construction to suspend giant colorful puppets above the courtyard walls at MoMA PS1. Conceived of as a “visual poem,” the performance, which re-enacts a sunflower blooming through cracks of a city sidewalk, includes live musical accompaniment. Afterward, the puppets will be on view in the museum lobby as part of “Life Between Buildings” (on view through January 16, 2023), a show about artists activating unexpected, underutilized spaces in New York from 1970 to the present, including at the PS1 building itself.

Location: MoMA PS1, 22-25 Jackson Avenue, Queens
Price: Free with RSVP
Time: Friday, 7 p.m.–7:45 p.m.; Saturday, 3 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Monday, August 1

Lydia Ourahmane, <em> Tassili</em> (2022), installation view in "Lydia Ourahmane: Tassili" at Sculpture Center, Queens. Photo by Charles Benton, courtesy of the artist and Sculpture Center, Queens.

Lydia Ourahmane, (2022), installation view in “Lydia Ourahmane: Tassili” at Sculpture Center, Queens. Photo by Charles Benton, courtesy of the artist and Sculpture Center, Queens.

8. “Lydia Ourahmane: Tassili” at Sculpture Center, Queens

Born in Algeria in 1992, Lydia Ourahmane calls Algiers and Barcelona home. Her newly commissioned video work in her Sculpture Center solo show is based on her trip across the Tassili n’Ajjer plateau on the country’s border with Libya, a 10-day journey on foot requiring native Tuareg guides. The film also draws on the many prehistoric engravings and cave paintings found in the region, turning them into digital animations that evoke the spiritual nature of the plateau and the ancient rites conducted there.

Location: SculptureCenter, 44-19 Purves Street, Long Island City
Price: Free
Time: Thursday–Monday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Friday, August 5

"Yoan Capote: Requiem | Purification" at Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. Photo courtesy of Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

“Yoan Capote: Requiem | Purification” at Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. Photo courtesy of Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

9. “Yoan Capote: Requiem, Purification” at Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

Cuban artist Yoan Capote takes over both of Jack Shainman’s Chelsea locations with pieces from two series that expand upon his seascape works. For Cuban migrants, the sea can mean both death and rebirth, a barrier and a route to freedom. The artist incorporates recycled fishhooks, deconstructed barbed wire, gold leaf, and plaster into his mixed-media work. Capote’s series “Requiem,” on view at 20th Street, is inspired by the art he saw in museums and churches during a recent trip to Italy, a destination for migrants attempting to traverse the Mediterranean Sea. What surfaced were parallels to his own deeply complicated relationship with the sea. The resulting paintings are adorned with gold leaf recalling historic religion icons, contrasting with the chains, barbed wire fencing, and other metal detritus that make up the “Purification” works at 24th Street.

Location: Jack Shainman Gallery, 524 West 24th Street, and 513 West 20th Street, New York
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Saturday, August 6

Oasa DuVerney, A Growing Veil 2022. Photo courtesy of Welancora Gallery

Oasa DuVerney, (2022). Photo courtesy of Welancora Gallery

10. “Oasa DuVerney: A World to Live In” at Welancora Gallery, Brooklyn

For her first solo exhibition with Welancora, Oasa DuVerney presents a series of graphite drawings of Black figures embellished with boldly colored flowers in acrylic paint. The juxtaposition is meant to compare seemingly exotic blooms like Lady Slipper orchids—which are actually native plants—to Black womanhood. The show also features her signature graphite on cut paper “Black Power Waves,” a visual metaphor for Black power.

Location: Welancora Gallery, 33 Herkimer Street, Brooklyn
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. by appointment only

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Friday, August 12

Robin F. Williams, Thirst (2022). Courtesy of the artist, Mrs., and P.P.O.W., New York. Photo by JSP Art Photography.

Robin F. Williams, (2022). Courtesy of the artist, Mrs., and P.P.O.W., New York. Photo by JSP Art Photography.

11. “A Few Small Nips” at Mrs. Gallery, Maspeth

Painted in 1935, Frida Kahlo’s A Few Small Nips is among the Mexican artist’s most indelible images. The painting shows a naked, butchered woman on a bed with a man standing above her. Kahlo painted the image after discovering Diego Rivera’s affair with her younger sister Cristina; the title she’d taken from a headline quote of a man who’d murdered his wife in a drunken rage. This group show brings together the works of artists Marisa Adesman, Genesis Belanger, Langdon Graves, Koak, Jesse Mockrin, Rose Nestler, GaHee Park, Jennifer Rose Sciarrino, and Robin F. Williams, who each explore the culture of femininity, in which the depths of women’s of experiences are subverted and refracted to preserve a mask of civility.

Location: Mrs. Gallery, 60-40 56th Drive, Maspeth, NY 11378
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Friday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.; Saturday, 12–5 p.m.

—Katie White 

 

Helen Rae, <em>July 19, 2018</em> (2018). Courtesy of Andrew Edlin Gallery, New York.

Helen Rae, (2018). Courtesy of Andrew Edlin Gallery, New York.

12. “Helen Rae: Runway” at Andrew Edlin Gallery, New York

Andrew Edlin presents the first posthumous exhibition for Outsider artist Helen Rae, who died in 2021 at age 83. Born deaf and unable to speak, Rae began making her vibrant color pencil drawings at age 50, when her mom signed her up for studio art classes for developmentally disabled adults at the Tierra del Sol Foundation in Sunland-Tujunga, California. Her works are based on fashion advertisements, transforming glossy photoshoots into eccentric yet captivating visions.

Location: Andrew Edlin Gallery, 212 Bowery, New York
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

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