Spotlight: In Arles, 12 Photographers Consider How Otherness Illuminates Our Sense of Ourselves

0
20

What You Need to Know: Arles is famously home to Rencontres d’Arles, an annual photography festival founded in 1970 that draws image-lovers to the city every year. The city’s Art Trope Gallery, too, takes photography as its focus, organizing exhibitions of artists who engage with the medium from an experimental perspective. This summer, the gallery is presenting the work of 12 photographers in “Alterity: I Is an Other, a thought-provoking show that considers how ideas of difference are instrumental in defining a sense of self. 

Norman Reedus, Bloody Portrait Session My Trailer (Made a Mess) (2012). © Norman Reedus Courtesy of Art Trope Gallery.

Norman Reedus, (2012). © Norman Reedus. Courtesy of Art Trope Gallery.

Why We Like It: Alterity is defined as the state of being other or different, and in this diverse exhibition, a sense of peculiarity ties the photographs on view together. The show features 10 of the gallery’s artists, as well as two guest artists, the American actor and photographer Norman Reedus and French filmmaker Fabienne Berthaud. The photographic works on view range from landscapes and moody portraits to experimental abstractions; in these pictures, a sense of strangeness emanates not from the subjects themselves, but from the photographers’ approach to the world around them. Maxime Vignaud, for instance, transforms the image of a child standing on the road into an eerie apparition, while Hélène Hubert’s photograph of a ballet costume floating through a swimming pool is filled with narrative possibilities.

Fabienne Berthaud, Sans Titre 20 (2020). Courtesy of Art Trope Gallery.

Fabienne Berthaud, (2020). © Fabienne Berthaud. Courtesy of Art Trope Gallery.

According to the Gallery:Philosopher Edgar Morin wisely said, ‘But the beauty of love…is to find one’s truth through otherness.’ Indeed, at Art Trope Gallery, we also believe that knowing our deepest selves and our society originates from our discovery of what we regard as different. This cursor, which each human being places according to his life, essentially defines who we are. The exhibition points out how important knowledge of others is to the understanding of the individual self: it is a celebration of accepting ourselves and others.” 

Browse works from the exhibition below.

 

(2021)
Inquire for More Information

Sabrina Le Roux, Divinity (2021). © Sabrina Le Roux. Courtesy of Art Trope Gallery.

Sabrina Le Roux, (2021). © Sabrina Le Roux. Courtesy of Art Trope Gallery.

 

(2020)
Inquire for More Information

Maxime Vignaud, A Kid Who Will Never Come Back (2020) © Maxime Vignaud. Courtesy of Art Trope Gallery.

Maxime Vignaud, (2020) © Maxime Vignaud. Courtesy of Art Trope Gallery.

 

(2020)
Inquire for More Information

Helene Hubert, Ballerina (2020) © Hélène Hubert. Courtesy of Art Trope Gallery.

Hélène Hubert, (2020). © Hélène Hubert. Courtesy of Art Trope Gallery.

 

(2020)
Inquire for More Information

Bertrand Gruyer, Window 08 Al (2020). © Bertrand Gruyer. Courtesy of Art Trope Gallery.

Bertrand Gruyer, (2020). © Bertrand Gruyer. Courtesy of Art Trope Gallery.

 

(2019)
Inquire for More Information

Ana D & Noora K, Moveo II (2019). © Ana D & Noora K. Courtesy of Art Trope Gallery

Ana D & Noora K, (2019). © Ana D & Noora K. Courtesy of Art Trope Gallery

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here