Banksy’s Blockbuster Show in Glasgow Attracts Record Crowds—and the Artist Wants You to Decide Where It Should Travel Next

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Banksy may not have had an authorized solo show in 14 years, but if anything, that seemed to stoke the demand for his recent outing at Glasgow’s Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA), which set attendance records for the institution with 180,000 visitors over the show’s 10-week run.

Titled “Banksy: Cut and Run,” the exhibition enforced a strict no photographs rule—all cell phones had to be secured in locked pouches, at the anonymous British street artist’s request. But that apparently didn’t dampen enthusiasm from museum goers, who included actor Johnny Depp and Jarvis Cocker of the band Pulp, according to the Scotland .

“‘Cut and Run’ has welcomed a new and diverse audience, from primary school pupils to octogenarians, from all areas of society and corners of the globe,” GoMA director Gareth James said in a statement, as reported by the , noting that the institution had to implement late-night hours to meet the audience demand. “Every day we open our doors to queues of hundreds of people waiting for walk-up tickets.”

It was the first time that the museum had charged paid admission for an exhibition. The show, which presented an in-depth retrospective of Banksy’s 25-year career, included a replica of the artist’s work station, a massive selection of his stencils, and all the behind-the-scenes details on how he got to infamously shred itself after hammering down for $1.3 million at Sotheby’s London.

The original stencil piece for Banksy's <em>Girl With Balloon</eM>, which infamously shredded itself after selling at auction at Sotheby's London on display in "Banksy: Cut and Run" at Glasgow's Gallery of Modern Art. Photo by Jane Barlow/PA Images via Getty Images.

The original stencil piece for Banksy’s , which infamously shredded itself after selling at auction at Sotheby’s London on display in “Banksy: Cut and Run” at Glasgow’s Gallery of Modern Art. Photo by Jane Barlow/PA Images via Getty Images.

If you missed the exhibition in Glasgow, it appears you can still get another bite at the apple, as Banksy has updated the show’s official website to solicit ideas for where to next present it.

“We want to take this show on the road but have no idea where to go next. Do you?” the website asked.

Banksy's exhibition at the Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art. Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images.

Banksy’s exhibition at the Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art. Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images.

The artist is encouraging people to email their suggestions for the exhibition’s tour to [email protected], preferably with a specific location or venue in mind—not just a country or city—as well as photographs.

The show does not, however, confirm any details regarding Banksy’s identity, which has sparked countless theories over the years. Last month, a recording from a 2005 episode of NPR’s resurfaced that featured a purported interview with the artist, who is believed to have been born in Bristol, England, around the year 1974. 

 

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