Passionate French Francoise Nielly loves open spaces, blue lagoons, Paris and her vivid paintings, which she, like Big Brother, gives not names but ordinal numbers. The artist is really comfortable feeling surrounded by dazzling colors and bold contrasts, and her canvases attest to the absolute maturity of technique and craftsmanship.

Huge oil portraits may seem implausible precisely because of the deliberate layering of colors and saturated gamut, but even the most biased art historian is unable to resist the energy of the paintings. Francoise explains the separation from reality in her work by the fact that over the course of her twenty-year artistic career she tries to explore the faces of various images and prefers to live in the “world of images”. Therefore, the French woman spends a lot of time looking at pictures, illustrations, animated graphics and black and white photographs. By the way, from the latter, the artist borrows plots and heroes for her portraits. Their Francoise draws a palette knife and only occasionally tweaks the details with his finger. Every work she calls “sexual, free and irresistible.” But random spectators who watched the process of creating at least one of the 614 portraits, describe the same Nielly at work with the same words. Witnesses argue that brush strokes are so expressive, and the movements of Francoise are so temperamental that the creation of the painting is more like a theatrical performance.

By the way, the artist borrows plots and heroes for her portraits. Their Francoise draws a palette knife and only occasionally tweaks the details with his finger. Every work she calls “sexual, free and irresistible.” But random spectators who watched the process of creating at least one of the 614 portraits, describe the same Nielly at work with the same words. Witnesses argue that brush strokes are so expressive, and the movements of Françoise are so temperamental that the creation of the painting is more like a theatrical performance.

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